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of our operating revenue from membership dues f. you're not a member of the society, please join us or renew your membership today. i should note that anyone who joins or renews a membership today will receive a free autographed copy of our keynote speaker's new book, the title of which is martin's dream: my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr. we have a terrific program planned for you today. of course, the heart of the program will be our speaker, will be the remarks of our keynote speaker dr. claiborne parson. you have a program in front of you -- with you, and we will be following the program. we do have a number of members of the city's official family here with us today. the list of which i don't have and the number of community dignitaries. i see that we do have supervisor scott wiener, supervisor president of the board of supervisors david chiu, president cisneros, barbara garcia is with us. naomi is going to be part of the program. naomi kelly is with us, kim brandon from the port commission is with us, and a number of others. i'll be getting a list, i'll be ab
in the association. i think concerning this item, it is important for me and all of us to recognize there are ballot points of view. if we're serious about developing solutions that work for all of us, we have to entertain those points of view and tried to reach consensus. that is the only one that we will create a workable, sustainable solutions. all we're doing is spinning our wheels. my reason for being here is because i truly have come to the conclusion that it is not only based on years on the ground operationally but years of working on development of public policy, working with state governments and justice and lower in corp. -- incarceration and working with other people. a variety of settings. i do not believe that incarceration has taken us where we need to be. i believe the war on drugs has been a failure. when we institutionalize people over extended periods of time, we take low-level offenders in the early stages and harden them and we send them to the university of crime. by the time they get out of prison, they become a bigger social problem. where i come from, whether it is the [unin
, and the county for building. for any athletic field and neighborhood parks, call 831- 5510. you can also write us at permits and reservations. or walking in and say hello at old log cabin, golden gate park. and of course you can find more information at sfrecpark.org. >> the renovation of balboa park, the oldest in the city of san francisco, and now it is the newest part in the city of san francisco. through our partnership, and because of public investment from the two thousand eight fund, we are celebrating a renewal and an awakening of this park. we have it safer, happier, more joyous. >> 3, 2, 1, [laughter] =--[applause] >> it is a great resource for families, to have fun in the city, recreation. >> this is an amazing park. we have not revitalized it without public and private investment. the critical piece of the process of this renovation was that it was all about the community. we reached out to everyone in this community. we love this park dearly and they all had thoughts and ideas and they wanted to bring their own creativity and their personality to bear on the design. what you see is w
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
are local and jobs are local. each of us each day can fix the neighborhood. real progress is credit place specific and - this concreteness is one of the benefits of college track. it lift up one student after another it looks after and supports individuals. it stands or falls on the local individual concrete attention. there is nothing global about it's on the difference even though we believe that other institutions like ours with help the world. slowly we partially we build out. we're great deal of that mayor lee has chosen to make his first state of the city address here. it sends a message for all student in san francisco. you know that this city's future don't understand on the education we provide for all our children. it's with great pleurisy introduce the mayor of the city of san francisco. good morning thank you laura republican for that kind introduction and thank you for opening your divorces to me this morning. i want to honor david and all your supervisors and to our two newest supervisors. mayor brown thank you for being here and taking the time to join us this morning. you
lacked this ability that most of us take for granted, that is how they feel. hopefully, i did giving you a touch of a psychopathy for a nanosecond. how do we study people like him? we can transport him out from the present to the hospital. one of the things my lab does, we built a really nice trailer in new mexico. here is my trailer. i live in a trailer in mexico. [laughter] this trailer has a really nice mri in it. we work with inmates to volunteer force studies and how to make them better. what we have found is that individuals to have those psychopathic traits, only about a third of all inmates will score really high on the straights. they have reduced gray matter density in these areas. this is the same area where that guy had the tumor. these individuals, control and for all the important things, they are all from pretty average environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start this seminar. i am happy to an
] >> i saw merl and larry, if you want to join us. as we said, this building is complex. and it starts with the funding. it will get more complicated with the construction pretty soon, but it has really been an unbelievable group effort to pull together the different funders of this work. we heard about the koret's foundation amazing con tributionss and i know there have been so many amazing contributions on the st. anthony side. for an affordable housing project for this it takes incredible people and we start with hud, who supplied over $20 million to make this project possible. larry ferguson is here, the director of the hud 202 programs that gets the senior housing funds and an important thing to know about the hud 202 programs not only do they provide capital, but a rental subsidy. so seniors on social security, or even less income don't have to worry about whether they can make a $1,000 rent payment. they pay 30% of whatever they can pay and the federal government helps us make up the difference, so we can keep people housed. there are folks out there who understand why this is
with the back of my hand. i said use all 10 fingers, i'll buy you breakfast. checkpoint, security, two. i survived the situation, got on the plane. the point is this, that what's in my head i've never had to apologize for. first thought wrong properly filtered was some kind of rehabilitation or education or part of the c.o. or the p.d. or the d.a., helps first thought wrong become next right thing. you can do it. i can teach the incarcerated population what to want because they always get what they wanted. they wanted more, they got more. they got it, they got it. they want someday, they left with none. they wanted her or him, they got that. i can tell them what to want now. pass first thought wrong, what to want. they do the right work, i can show them how to keep it this time. my boy's safe all day. it's not because of me. it's because of efforts like this. [applause] >> as our panelists take the stage and get seated, let me introduce our discussion. earlier this year, california state senator mark leno introduced legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession unde
be curriculum and the curriculum is used widely across the country. it's in every state in the country and in canada and 70 countries around the world and programs we're familiar with is second step and i am hearing some nods and we have a -- idea of kind of what kind of things that we do, and i also do advocacy work so i come and speak at meetings like this. i was at the attorney general's meeting in washington state and i would like to congratulate you and especially those in law enforcement in california for the high level of discourse that you have incredibly impressed today by what i have heard my h good work you're doing. so i do advocacy and part of that is kind of reaching out to people and bringing the message of social emotional learning not just to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into families so that people kind of understand this process of another way of learning and becoming an educated person. a co
and are going to have treatment. i also agree with tal, not necessarily everybody that uses drugs is an addict, and not necessarily everybody who uses drugs needs to have treatment. but having said that, people that we often come in contact with will be people who have a severe drug abuse problem and generally they also have a mental health issue problem, there are often housing problems, employment, many other problems, and that's the population we deal with often. and i think that figuring a way to have an intervention so that services are available for those that need it i think is really important. i don't necessarily agree a felony conviction is the vehicle to do so, but i think we have to make sure that as we lower the sanctions here, that we do have the tools and that we have the ability to distinguish between people that have a drug addiction problem, people that are using drugs recreationally and otherwise are a functional person. >> we're going to be taking audience questions shortly, so if you have a question, just try to get the attention of someone in the aisles. ethan, let me ask
and celebrate with us on helping us turn the state on something that is going to happen that has been a miracle now, 38 million times for people in the last 60 years, father harden, that is just you and your staff. all of the volunteers, you know, the volunteers at the heart of the success of st. anthony's dining hall. [ applause ] >> i want to say that, because i have been at those kitchens. i have served meals. i know that it is tough to have people who are down and out in the worst times of their lives to be able to be introduced -- and we know it's more than a meal, but it gets started with a home-cooked meal. and then the hands come out and then the thoughts and hearts exchange and how can we help you? and that has been, i think, the ingredients for more than just a great meal. it's an ingredients of life and how we celebrate it here. it is as leader pelosi said, it's our character of san francisco. and so it is also part to say not only do we add that with a new dining hall, but we add on top of that 90 units of affordable housing for our seniors. how wonderful can that be? [ applause ]
here in the 21st century. and if you look around, many of those men and women are right here with us in the rotunda today. we remember the people who braved police dogs and fire hoses turned against them by their own government officials in the south, people who believed that an idea -- believed in an idea that we're all created equal and that we're willing to risk and that we're willing to risk their life in the purchase soul of a lofty promise in america. today we celebrate black history month and the catalyst to progress that the emancipation proclamation as well as the march on washington provided us. we are familiar with the incarnation, whether it's the work of gandhi, mother theresa, or nelson mandela, people who have carried the torch of love and equality into the dark caves of tyrany and emerged bloody, but unbowed, they are examples of love's true limitless potential. thank you. (applause) >> and even, and even in the face of institutional hatred, the legacy of their work is a beacon for the world that loves will triumphant at the end of the day. it's triumphant because lo
this is a great start. yes. (applause) >> but we also have tremendous help from people who are helping us create the policies and the accountability in all the different departments. melva davis, kim brandon, willie adams at the port, chuck collins, [speaker not understood], the reverend amos brown, denise tyson, linda richardson, sonya harris, patricia thomas, veronica honeycut, these are just the names of a few of our commissioners who are heading up those very important divisions of our city. and they are joining with me and with the supervisors and with the department heads to do what mrs. obama asked us to do. whenever we occupy these public positions throughout the city or throughout the state or throughout the nation, we do the right thing, we keep the doors of opportunity open and enriched for everybody else. and we're already seeing it happen. yesterday i was at the luncheon for the boys and girls club, wonderful, wonderful entity that's reaching out to all of our young high school kids and make sure they're motivated to go to college. you should have heard them talk about their futures
they are teaching us. not saying that it is a total reason for why it and others turn out the way that we turned out, but it plays a part. just like i have to be held accountable for the choices i make, and so does a society. >> i keep hearing the term gang. in the black community in the bay area, it is a community, it is not a gang. you can move up in their ranks as if you are working for apple or ibm. you can move from a regular employee to ceo. in the black community, it is not like this. it is not structured like that. there is no one at sagging or telling you how to operate. there is a term in the black community called a one-man army. it is someone who acts alone. he did not bring anybody with them, he is called a one-man army. he does not have to report to anybody. none of that. i do not know if that is worse than a hierarchy. at the end of the day, i mean, it is not a gang. it is a community. i know that i am not going to get the word again abolished from the media, but i want to clarify. as long as you keep putting a label on it, it will have a negative connotation towards these kids. parti
and opportunity after all are at the heart of the this place the idea we call san francisco. you know, many of us came here from smoip else or their parents did. and whether it was guadalajara or a rural county in texas what brought us here was that hope where in san francisco as most places offered a better life. it was judged by a play we create not by a language we grew up with. we're a city that rewards the inno matter and the risktaker. fred and harvey ye very and willie brown and nancycy pelosi. we've known our share of adversity, earthquake and the problems with aids. we're not afraid to fail or doing what we know is right. and most importantly we know that none of us succeed alone whether it's in reconcile or business or life. we know as michelle obama said so well, this past summer when you walk through that door of opportunity you don't slam it shut you help someone else walk through that door behind you. my fellow san franciscans i know there's no limit to the opportunities in this city in we keep the door open. if we commit ourselves and put politics behind us we can help future gener
they are treading down. slowly but surely being restricted to the fringe while the rest of us march on holding hands to our collective prosperity. and, so, here we are today gathered once again on an annual basis. we've come to celebrate black history month. and we are celebrating ourselves. we are celebrating ourselves for the transformations that we have gone through, our sacrifice, and our willingness to look ourselves in the mirror, to transform ourselves into a better society, a better country and a better city. now today we stand on the shoulders of the great giants who came before us -- oh, that's my signal. [laughter] >> no respect. [laughter] >> fortunate for al williams i'm almost done. today we stand on the great shoulders of the folks that have come before us. and i wish you all a very happy and empowering black history month. i do have one piece of business that i'd like to share with you. on tuesday, i, along with the co-sponsorship of supervisor breed introduced a resolution celebrating the 100th birthday of sister rosa parks and commemorating the modern civil rights leader for her co
. it's something that i really advocate for and our caution to use zero tolerance and exclusionary discipline policies and also i teach teachers at san jose state and hundred students who are future teachers. >> can they do a projector? >> no. my teacher did, but again using social media, integrating all of the areas is so important for the prevention. thank you for that focus too and i think that gentleman has comments. >> i was going to follow up in the conversation with digital media or literacy needed within the educational system. we are still experiencing digital divide and access and just the one you speak of recently officer when you mention the generations and investigators not engaged with this media and no don't know my book or face space and when you have to look at youth culture. we talk about texting and sexing and omg and i didn't text anything to you. i spoke to and part of the language and how they engage so until we look at the culture of young people and how do we impact today's 20th century media culture we can't make a huge impact in regards to bullying or
initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obl
such a champion here today with us to bring that word back to the folks. [phra*-uplt/] >> i'm going to do more thank yous as we go through the process, but i wanted to just turn it over to barry to talk a little bit about this from the st. anthony's perspective. >> thank you, doug. it's already been said a number of times already today, this is exciting. many of us have been waiting a long, long time for this day. of course we're all here today to celebrate something new. but when i look out on all of you gathered here, i see something very familiar about this gathering. yes, we're here to break ground on something new, a new buildings that will house the new st. anthony's dining room and 90 units of affordable housing for our seniors, sponsored by mercy. but when i look out and i see all of these different people gathered here, jones and golden gate, i'm sorry struck by how in so many ways it's very normal and natural. there is nothing different about today than other days. people hanging out, on this corner, is nothing new. yes, a new venture with mercy housing and st. anthony foundation in
spaces and providing electrical charging stations for alternative vehicles. >> it's time for us to have a home that all of us can be proud of. >> and we couldn't do this without everybody working together on the one goal, which is, let's build something that reflects the honor of hetch hetchy, the honor of the greatest engineering feats, reflects what our puc does for our public, and for generations to come it will educate everybody. >> i'm really proud that one of the greenest and most sustainable buildings is here in norm in district 6. the wind turbine, the solar power, the living machines, recycled water that ed and the mayor has already spoken to. and what's also amazing about this building is it's not just internally, but you can actually see it on the outside. so, when people are walking around the city they can actually see the green and environmental aspects. >> what better way to show that the puc cares about the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for t
, things that you can't even imagine happening happen in their lives. i think that's what all of us up here are talking about when we mention martin's dream. one of the other things that i would say is that we need to properly recognize martin luther king as the world leader he is. i think it diminishes him to say he was an african-american civil rights leader. he was that, but he was so much more. he was the person who symbolized one of the great new movements of human history. when i go back and read his speeches, i'm particularly struck by the way in which he linked our struggle to struggles going on around the world. when he spoke, at the end of his life in memphis, and on the last evening of his life he's speaking to sanitation workers. and we have to remember that by calling him a civil rights leader, it doesn't quite encompass why he would be in memphis leading a strike of sanitation workers. but he performed the role that he had performed so often in his life. he inspired the strikers by telling them their labor struggle was connected to the historic labor struggle throughout the wo
the mixed use development with the san francisco giants at c-3 lot will create vibrant new neighborhoods. and in less than 5 years we'll workman's compensation the golden state wares. a crumpling appear for parked cars will be transformed into a new arena bringing people closer to the waterfront and creating good jobs and year-round jobs. it will a be a short walk along the waterfront. leakage those kinds of opportunities attacking on a mba france should i say and privately finance and building a new facility on your water front only come once in a lifetime. we have a obligation to always put our people first and we must have the best opportunity for building all the facilities we need. i think that we have looerdz who are attentive to the neighbors and the public. well this is a partisanship that's meant to last. i look forward to doing this right. and sees this extraordinary opportunity. and as you can see our opportunity is not just think building it's about the international events we attract. and children and old will see a wonderful water space. last week many of us celebrate the
. it has played a role in moving people to see some of the backroom dealings of u.s. foreign policy. it has exposed people to think harder. i do think it played a role in leading people in tunisia and egypt to look at some of the cables and see what people already knew in their gut the soccer field in wikileaks about the alliances between u.s. foreign policy with the most repressive elements in those countries. let's hope that changes as the uprisings continue. anytime you can learn more about what is being done in our name, it is critical. that is part of what transparency is about. the freedom of information act is still not working well under the obama administration. some of that is pos/t 9/11. in los war will lead to a decline in information transparency access. anytime you can have less sequence -- secrecy, that is good. less secrecy is needed. it was handled at the outset by partnering with newspapers like "the guardian," traditional newspapers of distinction. wikileaks released documents around the world to newspapers in india, haiti, the middle east, latin america. it has had an im
. and this transformation of the world's peasants, and many of us are not too many generations removed from peasantery, has been the most important achievement of the modern age. * and i have learned that this freedom struggle has been accomplished not simply through this transformation accomplished not simply through freedom struggles, but through the mass migrationses that brought my parents out of the south toward opportunities in the north. and with that great transformation of peasants into citizens is still going on right here in san francisco and in california. he chose to end, and i'll end, his great oration on that last day with his recognition that our struggle and his dream is still unfulfilled. i can imagine him, if he were invited back today as an 84-year-old, he would still be talking about the fact that his dream remains unfulfilled. i could see that his dream, however, still endures in the freedom struggles of our time and in all future freedom struggles. because we can still imagine him speaking of the day when freedom will ring in every village, in every hamlet throughout the world, and t
to talk about. >> we should all remember that most of us are at least descendants of immigrants. one thing about justice in a different sense -- i have a question here that says that some constitutions -- and they mention the cuban one -- include health and literacy as basic rights. should we think of those as basic rights? you will certainly realize that at least as to help, that is one of the key problems going on in the present debt ceiling controversy in washington. >> my favorite book just recently, and i tell you it is $9.95 on amazon, is president kennedy's book called "nation of immigrants." it was written in the early 1960's. it will take you a couple of hours to read it again. it is a fabulous book and makes you realize that nothing has changed in the last 50 years. he talks about why we are a nation of immigrants and why that has been the strength of america. so, yes, we are all a nation of immigrants. we should remember that in these debates. but florida has an interesting process, something the all states should adopt, but every 20 years, a group of 30 citizens are awarded by
. we are finally seeing once again california's innovation is leading us out of the last three years of recession. i do not know about you but i am pretty tired of the recession. i made a statement several years ago that it was about time for an adjustment to the economy, things were too expensive, overheated. two years after that, i regretted making that comment. it was great to hear jim say when you look at education, you look at the programs, traveling around the world, that there is one constant. there are people and technology that say this is a place they want to be. entrepreneurs say this is where they want to be. when companies like facebook are started at an institution like harvard and a pier, you start to recognize why this is so special and fiber and why innovation is a bleeding heart economy. so let me try to give some brief introductions about our panel today. i have to confess, i only just met one of our panelists, lee said dyson, the ceo of coverity. she got a ph.d. in physics from mit but felt the urge to come out here to california and she did her research at stanfo
not see as many long term investments as we used to. >> how do you define a long-term investment? >> good question. so, i think the question is, how speculative is this? i will use us as an example. we have a team in this building working on lithium batteries. their goal is to build a battery with 500 miles of range, for obvious reasons. we hope they will have a prototype in the feet next few years. we think -- in the next few years. we think the stars are lined up. that is a long-term investment. >> next question to all of you. michael, we will start with you. we know government is the regional -- at the regional, state, and local level can help or hinder startup companies. what would you like to see from the governments here in the valley, sacramento, or in d.c., that would strengthen the innovation economy? >> i could go on about immigration and corporate tax policy reform, but i am a researcher, so i will not. >> and we have seven minutes. >> mayor lee said it perfectly. the fundamental thing that companies are looking for is to be engaged in the process. we use a term in computing ca
. and i thought the ta did an excellent job and really showing us the big picture. the other thing i wanted to do was to thank the department for their work with the chinatown flower festival. it was last weekend and it was a fabulous event. there was some moments of nervous us in that we knew we were going to get the [speaker not understood] for the flower festival. department did a great job in that [speaker not understood]. thank you very much. >> thank you. director burgess. [speaker not understood]. >> i just wanted to offer my congratulations to chairman nolan for being reappointed by mayor lee to serve another term on the mta board and continue to serve as our chairman. i know we're all looking forward to another four-year. >> are you speaking of everybody here, four more years? >> i think i can safely speak on behalf of everyone. [laughter] >> thank you, it was very gracious, very kind. okay, -- director regis. >> yes. very quickly i, too, would like to join chairman nolan in thanking the staff for a great workshop on last week. it was phenomenal. but the other thing i would
was identical to that of the united states. those words in that constitution did not protect us. words do not protect you. understanding and be leaving in the words do. -- and believing in the words do. we today have a serious problem in that regard. the "new york times" three weeks ago -- "time" magazine three weeks ago reported as a cover story how the constitution is under siege, and "newsweek" about two months ago had a cover story about the failure of americans to understand our government. some very scary statistics. two out of every three graduating high-school students today believe that the three branches of government are republican, democrat, and independent. that is an actual poll. 75% of all americans don't know that religious freedom is protected by the first amendment. 75%. more americans can name the judges on "american idol" than on the supreme court of the united states. what does this mean to us? how did we get here? well, first of all, unless the next generation understands the obligations imposed by the constitution, we are going to have a serious, serious problem. my
francisco so special. we keep everybody here and that allow us to recover our economy, and everything because it's so interdependent. >> so that is a difficult goal but i think we can achieve it over the long time so thank you very much for hosting us and hosting this great exhibit, and thank you very much for joining >> welcome to "culturewire." today we are at recology. they are celebrate 20 years of one of the most incredibly unique artist residency programs. we are here to learn more from one of the resident artists. welcome to the show, deborah. tell us how this program began 20 years ago. >> the program began 20 years ago. our founder was an environmentalist and an activist and an artist in the 1970's. she started these street sweeping campaigns in the city. she started with kids. they had an exhibition at city hall. city officials heard about her efforts and they invited her to this facility. we thought it would coincide with our efforts to get folks to recycle, it is a great educational tool. since then, we have had 95 professional artists come through. >> how has the program
, the conditional use applications, the amendments to the zoning, zoning map, bulk, height, and although issues. i have a package which i will submit at the end of my testimony which elaborates those issues. i will try to paraphrase the key issues. one, a subsequent or supplemental e-i-r is required to access the environmental impacts of altering the alignment and terminus of the subway tunnels north of chinatown station. to change the tpm extraction location from columbus avenue to pagoda theater parcel. included in this package is a [speaker not understood] and geotechnical report, a letter from the various teams, geotechnical [speaker not understood] larry carp. there are issues also which include issues of dewatering and impacts on very fragile adjacent buildings. two, the subsequent and supplemental e-i-r is required to assess the impact thev historic resources which were not included in the previous e-i-r or the current evaluations. and finally, three, the subsequent supplemental [speaker not understood] to assess the environmental impacts of expanding central subway service north beach. so,
and do away with the logjam we have. mediation is a very useful and efficient way of handling some cases. many cases. it is part of the future of the practice of law. they can be the only part of the practice of law that we use to resolve disputes. >> 30 minutes to go. we are in good shape. i have not been aware of how the time works here. i am learning quickly, i think. in a way, the arbitration system exists in opposition to another fundamental element of our legal system, which is the jury system. we are interested in your views about the role of the jury system, both in civil and in criminal cases. >> well, i strongly believe in the jury system. i am a jury traveler. that is all i have done for 45 years. my personal experiences that i have seen the collective wisdom of a jury actually be one of the most beautiful things you can witness in achieving justice. sometimes, the jury, still following the law, can see through a lot of legal arguments and do what is right, legally right, and that is a beautiful part of the jury system. i have been involved with a magnet part of a celebration,
tomorrow's victims. that is painting with a very broad brush, but it's something that encourages us to take action. i think in my prosecutors office there is hard and soft power. the hard power in a prosecutor's office, in a police department, it's arresting. it's putting in jail. it's going in court and find this person guilty and punish them. that's a kind of hard power and most of what is done in a prosecutor's office -- most of the resources are devoted to those hard power tasks, but although we devote less resources to soft power there are probably more important and soft power is where you change the hearts and minds of people. where you try to change cultures, try to change the norms in the community are and certainly in our office we devote significant resources to this. just a couple of examples. we have something called the parent project, and i am very grateful in a time of really reduced funding our board of supervisors stepped up and provided funding for otherwise what was run on a shoe string out of our office, and it's a program that teaches parents to be better
of using profanity but because it was a different lapd. it was rumored that the mexican mafia was allowed to meet in his church and that he held guns for gang members. and he was helping gang members across the border. i am certain he knew where the body of jimmy hoffa was buried when you got done listening to the rumors. now, the lapd uses home with industries as an integral part of its anti-gang efforts. not all of them, not 9000 members, but i can tell you this, homeboy industries have their annual benefit to honor people in the community as well as former gang members, the person they honored was chief charlie of the lapd. unless you think that was an anomaly, the year before they honored the sheriff. there is an alliance between community-based organizations, and law-enforcement. this is not enough. there has also been in the streets, ongoing, a relationship, a delicate one, a thoughtful one between the loss angeles police department and gang intervention. interventionists are former gang members. they have to be very careful about how they play out the relationship. they do not want
come right to us, but we've invented this thing, which is not the most brilliant invention but working well and the social resolution way to solve bullying and other harassing content, so we created a flow where you could say "hey, i don't like that piece of content" and instead of reporting to facebook ink and we have 3,000 people but we don't understand the context of everything going on. you can report to a family or friend or somebody off the site. >> in the context -- >> in the context of the behavior itself. we have seen the reports go down. the closing of the reports go up and when we surveyed the people both the person reported and the person reporting -- not everyone, but most of the people were very satisfied how it resolved itself. now just think about that. somebody said -- so it's like i say to anne "anne nice shirt. nice jacket. >> but you hate it. >> and i hate it or maybe i don't. i'm giving a complement. the thing is facebook inc. doesn't know the context but now we have a system in place and i can resolve to anne and anne could say "i didn't mean to post that
's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week and there was a usa today story and suicide and especially among veterans right now and suicide is complex and we cannot send the message -- there is a lot of fear out there right now that bullying leads to suicide and suic
today to commit ourselves again to the good work that dennis is doing and in the past, we have used our technology network to reach out to the congregations and in turn, they are letting their congregg gant know, we are here, we are concerned and we are committed partners. >> thank you and once again that you to all of the community representatives here and treasurer jose sises narrows [spelling?] has been a wonderful partner and the bank on san francisco program is a great gram and gives some of our most vulnerable another place to go it a responsible lending program which helps folks get the assistance they need and deserve so so thank you very much for being here and i'm happy to take any questions that you may have. >>> [inaudible] >> instructor: in general, let me just -- in you find that pay day lending operations, oftentimes focus in some of our economically vulnerable communities to take advantage of those individuals who might not think they have any alternative but go to a pay day lending operation that to a have lending needs met. san francisco is actually has some of the
just grew up together. there were no handouts and no one told us how to conduct ourselves. and tell us what to wear. someone could have a school fight, and we may be at the mall, and see the person we have a fight with. the army and navy have their bar fights. i did not see this as being a game, or a community. supporting each other, this may have been in a negative way. i did not have a stable household. many of them do not of their fathers are, where their father is dead. in their return, the block i gave up -- this is who i looked up to. he had a notorious reputation. there was the violence and in return, we had the pros and cons for that. a lot of people would mess with me because of who my father was -- to my brother was. they became my enemies. it was not a choice. this is just how was. let's go get him. and it comes to the place, you get tired of running. i did not see this as being wrong. what people defined as a gang, that must be a gang member right there. i have tattoos on my arm and neck and hand, and none of them are getting associated. they all tell personal story in my l
. there is a circus company that i have been fortunate enough to work with the last couple of years. i use elements of dance and choreography and combine that with theater techniques. a lot of the work is content- based, has a strong narrative. the dancers have more of a theatrical feel. i think we are best known for our specific work. in the last 15 years, spending a lot of time focusing on issues that affect us and are related to the african-american experience, here in the united states. i had heard of marcus shelby and had been in join his work but never had the opportunity to meet him. we were brought together by the equal justice society specifically for this project. we were charged with beginning work. marquez and i spent a lot of time addressing our own position on the death penalty, our experiences with people who had been incarcerated, family members, friends of friends. pulling our information. beyond that, we did our own research. to create a picture that resonated with humanity. it is the shape of a house. in this context, it is also small and acts like a cell. i thought that was an i
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